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'Commercial Property' Category Archives

July 11th, 2019

Commercial property solicitors

Commercial property solicitors

With the assistance of our experienced commercial property solicitors, advisors, conveyancers and more, you can rely on us for sound legal support and advice regarding commercial conveyancing.

As a commercial property owner looking to buy, sell or lease property, a good comprehension of transactional laws can ensure that you’re able to make the best decisions for your situation.

The commercial property team at Foys Solicitors is here to help you make those decisions. Our passion for helping property owners with their commercial property needs led us to update our commercial property solicitors page with reliable and trustworthy information.

On the page, you’ll find out how we can help you with:

  • Acquisition and disposal of freehold and leasehold property
  • Landlord and tenant matters
  • Asset management
  • Property refinancing: bridging loans, mortgages, legal charges and debentures
  • Business sales and purchases
  • Purchasing and selling business premises
  • Handling complicated renewals
  • Problematic disputes with commercial tenants

Contact Foys Solicitors commercial property team today

For a free initial consultation on our services and how we can help you, call us on 01302 327136, email us at enquiries@foys.co.uk or complete our Contact Form.

For those considering entering the commercial property world, take a look at ‘the complete guide to becoming a commercial landlord’.

May 22nd, 2019

Dealing with rent arrears as a commercial landlord

When a tenant falls behind on their rental repayments they are said to be in arrears. Typically, a rental agreement stipulates that rent be paid 30 days after the starting date. If a tenant has failed to pay the agreed-upon sum for 30 days after the rent was due, they are then one month in arrears, and so on so forth.

For all landlords, rent arrears are a business risk and a relatively common occurrence. For commercial property landlords, you would usually diligently vet the tenants to prevent the occurrence of rent arrears, but despite your best efforts, your tenant may fall into arrears as a result of cash-flow problems being experienced by the business. When rent arrears do happen, there are legal recourses that landlords can take to recover rent, interest and any costs incurred as a result of the late payment.

In this article, our specialist commercial property solicitors at Foys aim to discuss the various legal avenues open to commercial landlords whose tenants have rent in arrears and the best practices for exercising the options available.

Establishing rent arrears

First and foremost, a dialogue should be opened with the tenant to investigate the reasons for the late payment of rent. A notice should be provided in writing to advise your tenant that they are in arrears. This is also an important piece of correspondence should the situation escalate and you need to pursue debt recovery via a legal pathway.

While making contact with your tenant regarding the initial late payment is good practice, you are able to serve them with a mandatory notice after 2 months of rent arrears to demand payment. Depending on the circumstances, an eviction notice should also be prepared.

Avenues open for debt recovery

Upon establishing that your tenant is unable or unwilling to fulfil their contractual obligations, it’s best that you contact an independent commercial landlord solicitor who will discuss a number of legal recourses available that will facilitate a resolution – some more painless than others. The main things to consider before deciding on a particular avenue are:

  1. Whether you want to keep the tenant on board and are happy to negotiate or compromise with respect to receiving the full payment.
  2. Look into the tenant’s history and see whether they have been in arrears before.
  3. Is the outstanding debt considerable enough to warrant a pursuit by legal or other means?
  4. Will pursuing debt recovery drive the tenant into insolvency and therefore lessen the likelihood of you recovering your money in full?

Talking to our commercial property solicitors and weighing up these three questions will give you a better gauge of the suitability of the options available as well as a better understanding of which method will likely give you the best chance at recovering your rent and any interest in its entirety.

Payment agreement

If the tenant is able to convince you that their financial situation is only temporary, or you believe that given more time they will be able to pay you back in full, you can enter into a payment agreement with them which requires the payment of the outstanding amount in instalments.

This is the preferred option for commercial landlords who don’t want to ruin the relationship they’ve established with the tenant, but also want to receive what’s owed to them in full. This option should also be considered in areas where the rental market is not conducive to short-term lets and high tenant turnovers, so it may be in your interests to preserve the relationship when considering your long-term prospects.

It’s advisable that this payment agreement be drawn up by a lawyer so as to carefully outline the rent arrears is to be paid on top of the normal rental agreement. In the event that this agreement is reneged on, the landlord reserves the right to forfeit the lease.

Drawing down on the rent deposit

If the initial rental agreement included a rent deposit, the landlord is within their rights to draw from this deposit in order to recover rent arrears – as long as the lease contract stipulates this. The tenant must then top up the deposit within a certain amount of time. This is the best course of action for commercial landlords that require a quick recovery of outstanding rent – however, it is only a short-term solution, so if the tenant is in a precarious financial situation, it’s not always advisable.

Serve a statutory demand

If your commercial property is being leased by a company and owes more than £750, you’re entitled to serve the tenant with a written demand for payment. This document needs to comply with statutory requirements, but once served, the tenant has 3 weeks to pay before you commence legal proceedings against them for insolvency or winding up of the company.

Forfeiture

In the event that rent has not been paid on time, usually for a period of between 14 and 21 days, a commercial landlord can “re-enter” a premises (when the tenant is not present) and change the locks – this is known as forfeiture. If the tenant is insolvent, then this is often the most economically viable option as it forces the tenant to pay up or face the potential loss of their business. Forfeiture is a tricky avenue to go down, so consulting an expert landlord solicitor such as Foys is always advisable – particularly if unsure of the rules surrounding this principle.

Pursuing a guarantor

If the tenant has a guarantor under the lease, then it is possible for a landlord to pursue them for the rent in arrears, rather than the tenant directly.

CRAR

The Commercial Rent Arrears Recovery Act 2014 is a legislative attempt to protect the rights of landlords by enabling them to employ an enforcement agency who will assume possession of a tenant’s goods for sale in order to recover debt. This is a complex process that requires various notices to be served on the tenant, and certain conditions need to have been met before the repossession can occur. CRAR should be considered carefully as it can only be used to recover rent, and entails waiving your right to forfeiture.

Issue Court Proceedings

Issuing court proceedings are often the last resort as they can be time-consuming and also expensive.

If you’re a commercial property owner or landlord who wants to know more about the possible avenues for recovering debt or you currently have a tenant whose rent is in arrears, speak to one of our specialist commercial property solicitors first. We can provide bespoke guidance as to the best practices for your commercial property, as well as assisting you with deciding on the best course of action for recovering full payment without breaking the bank.

To get in touch simply fill out our Online Form or call your local Foys Solicitors office:

If you found this interesting, check out:

This post is not legal advice and should not replace professional advice tailored to your specific circumstances. It is intended to provide information of general interest about current legal issues.

May 15th, 2019

Hosting an Airbnb: Everything a landlord needs to know


Airbnb is a global, online marketplace which matches homeowners with guests in regard to short-term homestays and/or tourism experiences in cities all over the world. It has emerged as one of the most successful and most popular rental services and hospitality companies globally thanks to its distinct advantages:

  • It allows homeowners to make extra income by renting out a room temporarily (a relatively low-risk, high-return approach).
  • It empowers travellers to seek low-cost or non-traditional accommodations.

Like other disruptive innovations, Airbnb has its fair share of controversy. The shift from hotels to Airbnb lodgings has led to cities losing out on millions on tourism taxes and once quiet neighbourhoods are being swamped with short-term sublets who may be too rowdy for one’s liking. In addition, while the ‘risk’ is deemed particularly low for those letting out their premises, the laws governing the rights and responsibilities of landlords and their guests aren’t clearly defined, and as such, this can have serious ramifications in circumstances where something does go awry.

There have been a handful of highly publicised incidents involving Airbnb guests occupying premises under false pretences, and others involving the questionable health and safety conditions of premises being rented via the room-sharing platform.

In 2016 a home rented in Putney through Airbnb was severely damaged after the guest held a party, with the same year seeing a balcony in Brighton collapse with four Airbnb guests injured in the process. Despite lawsuits being settled, the regulation of these properties is still an ongoing process – mainly due to the company’s global presence and legislation differing in many countries when it comes to health and safety and rental licencing and permissions.

Potential consequences for landlords

Airbnb operates in a legal grey area when it comes to navigating the murky waters of homeowner insurance and business related activities. Typically, a homeowner insurance policy excludes business-related activities as the property is not structured as corporate premises. This makes claims against the landlord (where a guest suffers an injury) or claims of property damage by the landlord difficult to traverse when it comes to insurance – particularly where liability is concerned. While Airbnb does offer Host Protection Insurance and has a track record of covering damage costs in the event of lessee fraud and false pretence, this doesn’t take the place of a substantial home insurance policy and as such, coverage can be problematic if a problem does arise.

Moreover, depending on where your property is located, you may be subject to specific planning regulations that dictate whether your premises is subject to additional costs as a result of letting. For instance, under UK property regulations, if a premises is available to let for 140 days or more per year it is classified as a self-catering property and consequently subject to business rates. Rates will be based on the property type, size, location and how many guests are able to stay in your listing.

This should certainly be considered and properly researched prior to advertising on Airbnb as you may be required to apply to your local council for a “change of use” to classify your property as commercial rather than residential.

If you are a responsible for the mortgage on your property, you need to ensure that subletting is permitted as the bank or mortgage company are invested in your property and as such, have a legal interest in its maintenance and upkeep.

As a landlord, your responsibilities for maintaining the property and ensuring your guests’ safety are the same under Airbnb’s rental terms and conditions. The company isn’t liable for upkeep, so ensuring that the structural integrity of your building and any fire, gas and electrical safety regulations are up to standard is your duty to the guests.

Protecting your guests, your home and yourself

If you’re planning to become an Airbnb host by listing your property on the Airbnb site, here are a few things you need to consider:

  • Check with your local council on its short-term rental legislation. In London, the Deregulation Act of 2015 allows homeowners to rent out their premises for up to 90 nights per calendar year without being considered a ‘change of use’. This means, once your property in London has been rented out for 90 days in a year, Airbnb automatically limits your listing unless you have planning permission to host more frequently.
  • If you own a leasehold property, chances are you will find a clause restricting your rights to sublet without the freeholder’s consent.
  • Check any terms and conditions in both your mortgage and insurance which may include clauses prohibiting your leasing of the premises.

Once you have established that your premises are able to be leased for short-term with Airbnb, the next step is clearly and comprehensively outlining what is allowed for guests staying at your property. This may include:

  • If you allow parties, pets or smoking.
  • Outline the ramifications if the rules are broken.
  • Ensure your insurance coverage is substantial and up-to-date.

How to resolve a dispute

The potential for a nightmare Airbnb guest is well documented, with stories gaining widespread media attention following the company’s prolific rise to success. But often not mentioned are disputes among neighbours who resent short-term guests holding wild parties and exhibiting anti-social behaviours.

If your Airbnb guests have left you with a flood of complaints from your neighbours, it’s wise to talk to them and resolve the issue directly. However, if they have taken their case to the First-Tier Tribunal (Property Chamber) which handles disputes over property and land, then it is best that you seek help from an experienced property solicitor like Foys.

At Foys Solicitors, we have a proven track record of assisting landlords in the understanding of their rights and responsibilities as well as in best protecting themselves and their finances. To get in touch simply fill out our Online Form or call your local Foys Solicitors office:

If you found this interesting, check out:

This post is not legal advice and should not replace professional advice tailored to your specific circumstances. It is intended to provide information of general interest about current legal issues.